Browse Items (54 total)

Second in a series of six

Lisa described how she moved into squares, discovering exciting squares at Pinewoods Camp from the calling of Larry Edelman and Kathy Anderson. Later, also at Pinewoods, she got a taste of modern Western squares from Bob…

Bob Dalsemer calls this singing square, with music provided by Notorious (Eden MacAdam Somer on fiddle, Larry Unger on guitar). Recorded January 18, 2013, at the Ralph Page Dance Legacy Weekend, Durham, NH. The dance was created by Maine caller and…

Bob Dalsemer calls this singing square, with music provided by Notorious (Eden MacAdam Somer on fiddle, Larry Unger on guitar). Recorded January 18, 2013, at the Ralph Page Dance Legacy Weekend, Durham, NH.

Bob Dalsemer calls a traditional square dance -- Right Hand High, Left Hand Low-- with music provided by Notorious (Larry Unger and Eden MacAdam Somer) and Old New England (Bob McQuillen, Jane Orzechowski, and Deanna Stiles). Recorded at the final…

Bob Dalsemer calls a Ted Sannella composition to the tune of Harborviewl; music provided by Old New England (Bob McQuillen, Jane Orzechowski, and Deanna Stiles). Recorded at a "Salute to Ted Sannella" workshop at the annual Ralph Page Dance Legacy…

Bob Dalsemer calls a Ted Sannella composition to the tune of Gaspé Reel; music provided by Old New England (Bob McQuillen, Jane Orzechowski, and Deanna Stiles). The clip includes Bob's walkthrough of the dance, plus several times through the…

The dance was written by Jerry Helt and recorded on MacGregor Records #816-A. Jerry writes, “It was inspired by the late Henry Ford who inspired so many of us with his ‘Tin Lizzie’! Please be my guest and do include it in your…

Author Bob Dalsemer discovers a long tradition of the "big circle" square dance on this island off the North Carolina coast, far from the Appalachian Mountains where it is usually encountered.

For moving images of the dance, click here.This is Bob Dalsemer's account of discovering an old dance form maintained in a rural Pennsylvania community:"On two occasions in 1979, I had the good fortune to visit the bi-weekly Saturday night square…

In the early 1970s, Bob Dalsemer heard about a dance series in Albanstown, northern Baltimore County, Maryland; the dances were no longer being held so he interviewed two sources to create this portrait of the local square dance.

Bob Dalsemer leads a workshop on "Dances of Maryland Line," a small town in northern Maryland that he visited often in the 1970s. Attentive viewers will note the distinctive style of promenade, a one-step around the square that was typical of…

Dalsemer describes dance figures as done in five rural West Virginia communities in the mid- to late 1970s and reports on their regular dance events, including programming, type of audience, price and method of admission, and the traditions of figure…