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John Newton - Turkey Mountain Window Smashers

Photographs, band logo and other ephemera related to John Newton's band

The first photograph shows the big family version of the Turkey Mountain Window Smashers, about 1989. Members are, L to R, John Newton on bass, Jill Newton on fiddle, Michael Donahue (Sally's husband) on fiddle, Jim Newton on guitar, Sally Newton on banjo-uke (with Sam…

MacNamara's Band - Basil "Smitty" Smith

Basil "Smitty" Smith calling with the Bills' Band at a barn dance in West Wardsboro, Vermont, recorded by Steve GreenMacNamara’s BandIrish song popularized by Bing CrosbyOh the head two couples separate, go halfway round outsideThe side two couples go right and left, to the other sideSwing that lady right where you meet her, you sing her on…

Green Mountain Land - Vermont square, 1950

This square dance sequence is part of a 1950 film, "Green Mountain Land," produced by Robert Flaherty and directed by David Flaherty. The narrator is caller Ted Glabach, from Dummerston, Vermont; musicians include Paul Robinson, fiddle; John Robinson, banjo; Bob Emerson, piano; unidentified bass player. The tourism promotional film was a joint…

Florilla Perkins Ames, Vermont

Florilla Perkins Ames was 102 years old when she recorded this interview. She lives in northern Vermont, and remembers her father calling dances. Before that, her mother's grandfather used to play fiddle for dances: "In fact, in this house where I am right now they used to dance squares upstairs, in the 1800s."

The Rural Square Dance in the Northeastern United States: A Continuity of Tradition

This doctoral thesis in folklore is based on a study of square dances in New York state, Vermont, and New Hampshire. Especially interesting are the descriptions of traditional dances, based on the author's observation, and interviews with dancers, augmented with questionnaires.The author notes the difficulties of collecting information from…

Square Dance in Schools

This short article explains the successful square dance program at a small public school in Fairlee, Vermont. (A side note, not mentioned in the article: Ed Durlacher was brought up from New York to teach and call dances with the demonstration groups. The related item looks at Durlacher's work with young dancers in a very different setting.)